Richiama

Richiama<br/>Installation view<br/>Ellis Island Museum, New York City<br/>July 2012

Richiama
Installation view
Ellis Island Museum, New York City
July 2012

Richiama<br/>Installation view<br/>Ellis Island Museum, New York City<br/>July 2012

Richiama
Installation view
Ellis Island Museum, New York City
July 2012

Richiama<br/>Installation view<br/>Ellis Island Museum, New York City<br/>July 2012

Richiama
Installation view
Ellis Island Museum, New York City
July 2012

Richiama<br/>Installation view<br/>Ellis Island Museum, New York City<br/>July 2012

Richiama
Installation view
Ellis Island Museum, New York City
July 2012

Richiama (I call for you)

Richiama is an exploration of lineage, the fragmentation of family and feminine immigrant identity. The term used when a Sicilian immigrant in America was ready to ‘call for’ their husbands, wives, sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, richiama is what those left behind longed to hear.

Based on the artist’s immigrant history, Richiama is a visual family tree, detailing each of her relatives that made the arduous journey from Naples between 1904 and 1949. With each type of lace representing a different gender and age, if examined, Richiama can literally be decoded to decipher the artist’s immediate immigrant family. The same 13 members appear on both the warp and weft, with the addition of the four American born members (including the artist herself) woven into the weft lace twill. The physical structure of Richiama is based upon frame looms found in the Ellis Island Museum archives.